Biblical Hebrew - Full Year -2018/19

Biblical Hebrew I provides an introduction to the ancient Hebrew language.  The course will begin with a few weeks of introductory work devoted to the ancient Hebrew alphabet and the sounds of the letters.  Students will then learn how to pronounce full words and, later on, full sentences.  Subsequent grammatical material will focus on the noun, the adjective, the definite article, and simple statements of existence, in addition to the structures and the meanings of the various verbal forms of ancient Hebrew. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity not only to pronounce,  but to read stories from the Old Testament in the original language of ancient Hebrew.  Biblical stories from Genesis regarding the Creation, Adam and Eve, Noah, Abraham, and Joseph with his “coat of many colors” will be the subjects of our work of translation and interpretation.  As students will find, reading the texts in the original, ancient language makes possible real insight not only into the stories themselves but into the process of close reading and analysis of any written work. Connections will be made where appropriate in the course between the grammatical forms of ancient Hebrew and those of other ancient languages like Aramaic (i.e., the language of Jesus), Ugaritic, ancient Arabic and Akkadian.

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Creative Writing - Fall 2018

In this course students will develop their creative writing skills in several modes and genres. They will be given the tools and suggestions to develop a daily writing practice, to find inspiration, to complete first drafts and to revise/edit to completion. Virtual workshopping with other students will be a component of this course. We will work with examples of strong writing as models and a source for response pieces. Students will also write creative pieces in response to visual art and will learn to use found sources such as newspapers for inspiration. Students will learn to find appropriate contests and markets for submission, although submission will not be a requirement of the course.

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Financial Literacy - Fall 2018, Spring 2019

This course covers topics such as savings and budgeting; managing credit cards; understanding a credit score and its implications; student loans for higher education; taxes and insurance; and how banks, the Federal Reserve and the Stock Exchange work. The goal of the course is to have the students develop a fundamental knowledge of concepts and vocabulary, which will become a foundation for sound financial decision-making in the future.

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General Psychology - Spring 2019

General Psychology introduces students to the major paradigms and systems in Psychology today. Students will be asked to treat Psychology like any other science, and use the scientific method to help them solve problems and gain a better understanding of themselves and others. As an introduction to the field of Psychology this class covers some of the most important as well as the most interesting fields within Psychology today including; Sensation and Perception, Consciousness and Dreams, Social Psychology, Personality Theories, and Abnormal Psychology. At the end of this class students will better understand all of the areas in their lives which are affected by Psychology everyday and be able to apply what they have learned to their own lives.

Jared Goldnap
Introduction to Astronomy - Full Year -2018/19

This course in astronomy is intended for both the enthusiast as well as those wishing to pursue further study in the field. The curriculum will be primarily qualitative in nature, with some basic mathematics and physics concepts being introduced when necessary or appropriate.

Topics of study will include: the fundamentals of astronomy; an introduction to the tools and techniques of modern astronomical observations; and historical development of our understanding of the Solar System as well as an introduction to extrasolar systems; the formation, nature, evolution, and death of stars; the interstellar medium; our Milky Way Galaxy; normal and active galaxies; large scale structure of the universe, and; modern ideas in cosmology and the early universe.

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Latin III/IV - Full Year -2018/19

Latin III/IV is a continuation of the Latin II course and consists of three main components: (1) a review and acquisition of grammar and syntax, (2) the translation and close reading of texts written in the original Latin and (3) a study of the culture and history of the ancient Romans.  The course will begin with a thorough overview of the basic Latin grammar and syntax learned in previous years of Latin (e.g., the declensions, conjugations, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, etc).  Students will then proceed to items relating to the more advanced Latin grammar and syntax, including the various participial formations, the ablative absolute, the gerund and gerundive constructions and the forms and syntax of the subjunctives.  As students work through the grammar and syntax, they will also be reading and analyzing texts of various lengths written by Caesar, Cicero, Ovid, Catullus, Vergil and other ancient writers not only so that they can practice and apply their understanding of the mechanics of the language but also so that they can gain a further appreciation of the richness and power of the Latin language.

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Latin I - Full Year -2018/19

The study of ancient Latin has witnessed a resurgence in recent years at both the Middle and the Upper School levels throughout the country -- and with good reason.  Knowledge of the vocabulary of Latin is of course enormously helpful in deciphering the meanings and nuances of tens of thousands of words in English. Perhaps even more importantly, knowledge of the structure of the Latin language in terms of its grammar and syntax provides special insight into the (far simpler) structure of the English language, the mastery of which leads to an almost immediate improvement in the English writing skills of the student.  The Latin I course offered through SophieConnect begins with an overview of the basic elements of English grammar and then proceeds to the systems of declensions and conjugations that are fundamental to Latin. Special attention will be paid to the developed case system for nouns and adjectives in Latin and to the various tenses of the Latin verb. Students will also work with Latin adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, pronouns and the passive voice. Daily exercises in Latin will reinforce what the students have learned, as will brief reading selections of modified ancient stories in Latin.  Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to learn about the culture and achievements of the ancient Romans. No prerequisites are required. The material in the course will be taught through a combination of video lectures and online tutorials designed to be used in conjunction with the textbook.

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Nutrition and Wellness - Spring 2019

In the Nutrition and Wellness course, students will take a look at current nutritional trends, current food guides, food labels, and the many steps to get our food from the farm to the table.  Students will delve into digestion and be introduced to the basic macro and micro nutrients (fats, proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals).  This knowledge will then be applied to a variety of topics, including food allergies/sensitivities, fuel for learning, and the effects of malnutrition.  Students will research and discuss the most common diets and their advantages and disadvantages.  This will lead into a discussion regarding healthy weight management and disordered eating.  This course will also offer a basic introduction to sports nutrition, and nutrition throughout the stages of life (pregnancy, baby, child, adolescent, and adult).

Jared Goldnap
Survey of Dystopian Novels - Spring 2019

This course will consider the dystopian genre by studying novels such as Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, 1984 by George Orwell, and The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. We will explore the common features of dystopia as speculative fiction and discuss why it became a vehicle for social commentary and the expression of social and political anxieties in the 20th Century.

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AP Art History

This course will help students develop an understanding and knowledge of diverse historical and cultural contexts of architecture, sculpture, painting and other media. Students will examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. Art history emphasizes understanding how and why works of art function in context, considering such issues as patronage, gender, and the functions and effects of works of art. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Art History exam in May.

Jared Goldap
AP Computer Science A

The Advanced Placement Computer Science course covers Java and all the algorithms, data structures and programming concepts in the Advanced Placement Computer Science syllabus. Students will write a number of programs over the course of the school year and will develop a solid foundation of programming skills, as well as an understanding of the fundamentals of computer science. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Computer Science A exam in May.

Jared Goldap
AP Computer Science Principles

AP Computer Science Principles Mobile introduces students to concepts and practices central to the study of computer science. This course is supported by the Mobile Computer Science Principles Project (Mobile CSP), an NSF-funded effort to provide a broad and rigorous introduction to computer science based on App Inventor, a mobile programming language for Android devices.  Working individually and collaboratively, students will use technology and programming to solve problems, create computational artifacts, investigate technological innovations that are personally meaningful, and discuss the impacts of computing technologies to their community, society, and the world.

The curriculum centers on seven Big Ideas: Computing is a creative activity. Abstraction reduces information and detail to facilitate focus on relevant concepts. Data and information facilitate creation of knowledge. Algorithms are used to develop and express solutions to computational problems. Programming enables problem solving. The Internet pervades modern computing. Computing has global impact.

Developed to broaden participation in computer science and STEM courses, AP Computer Science Principles fosters creativity and invites students to examine the social and ethical implications of new computing technologies.

Jared Goldap
AP English Language and Composition

The AP English Language course fosters college-level reading and writing skills. Through course readings, students will examine the practice of rhetoric: the way that writers advance arguments, communicate ideas, and shape reader reactions in prose writing. Students will also hone their skills as argumentative writers through formal and less-formal writing assignments and through peer and full-class analysis of each other's work. Students will finish the course with a strong grasp of academic writing conventions, will be fluent with critical inquiry, and will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition exam in May.

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AP English Literature and Criticism

The AP English Literature course develops students' abilities to carefully read and thoughtfully analyze works of imaginative literature. Students will read across genres and historical periods, encountering works of poetry, short and long fiction, drama, and nonfiction from the 16th century to contemporary works. By investigating examples of figurative language, detail, and historical contexts, the course encourages exploration of broad questions about literary structure, style, and themes. Developing their skills as writers alongside their skills as readers, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement English Literature and Criticism exam in May.

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AP Human Geography

The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. Special topics with which students engage in include the following: problems of economic development and cultural change, consequences of population growth, changing fertility rates, international migration, impacts of technological innovation on transportation, communication, industrialization, and other aspects of human life, struggles over political power and control of territory, conflicts over the demands of ethnic minorities, the role of women in society, the inequalities between developed and developing economies, explanations of why location matters to agricultural land use, industrial development, urban problems, and the role of climate change and environmental abuses in shaping the human landscapes on Earth.  Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Human Geography Exam in May.

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AP Macroeconomics

The purpose of the AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.

Jared Goldap
AP Microeconomics

The AP course in microeconomics will give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Microeconomics exam in May. 

Jared Goldap
AP Music Theory

The AP Music Theory class is designed to prepare students in the areas of music theory, analysis and ear training.  The course is ideal for the serious music student who plans to further their musical studies at the postsecondary level or perhaps pursue a career in music, but it is open to any experienced musician who desires to know more about how music is put together. It is the goal for the AP Music Theory student to recognize, understand and describe the basic processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. It is assumed that the student entering in this course has some previous musical training and can perform at an intermediate or advanced level, and is fluent in reading musical notation. At the end of the course, students will be prepared to sit for the advanced Placement Music Theory exam in May.

Jared Goldap
AP Psychology

This is a college-level course survey course with a curriculum determined by the College Board. The course of study includes the major subfields of psychology: the gathering and evaluation of evidence relating to human behavior, neuroscience, human development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning and memory, intelligence, motivation, emotion, social psychology, personality, and the understanding and evaluation of theories with regard to the causation and treatment of disorders. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Psychology exam in May.

Jared Goldap